Month: August 2015

Review: Angelfall

Review: Angelfall

I recently read End of Days (review to come this week), and realized I never properly reviewed Angelfall on the blog! I read it at an awkward time where I was just starting Lovely Literature, so there is a review of World After here, but nothing for Angelfall. Sad! I mean to remedy this, so excuse the awkward timing of these posts. Luckily, I did write a review on Goodreads, so I already have my thoughts collected. Reason I loved Angelfall #1: Penryn is better than Katniss. There, I said it — you have to admit there is a strong comparison between the two. I mean, kick-ass teen with a crazy non-dependable mom and no father, motivated to go to great lengths for her younger, sweet-as-pie sister in a dystopian world? Seems a little similar, no? But the similarities notwithstanding, I still loved Penryn. Other than her ability to kick serious butt,… Read more »

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Monthly Wrap-Up: August 2015

Monthly Wrap-Up: August 2015

    It is almost fall! As much as I hate to say goodbye to summer, I’m really excited to be writing a wrap-up because I love the fall. Sweater season! Tights, leggings, boots, huzzah! Despite this celebration, August wasn’t that bad. I didn’t do a ton besides working and camping and hosting my 10-year-old nephew for a week. We played a ton of video games, and oh man did this kid love Elder Scrolls Online. He tried playing Dragon Age 2 while I started a new character on EOS and HATED it. Ha, I wouldn’t let him try Dragon Age: Inquisition because it is my baby and he would just ruin it. Is that being a selfish aunt? Oh well. His main focus in gaming is stealing finding new loot and hoarding items that are relatively worthless. We also went to the Renaissance Festival, which is good for testing… Read more »

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When do you use the library?

When do you use the library?

  I’ll let you in on a little secret. I love the library, but it isn’t my first go-to for obtaining books. Okay, realistically that wasn’t a surprise for anyone. As much as I care about libraries and the miraculous nature of borrowing books, I also can’t resist the temptations that are Netgalley, Kindle deals and buying shiny new books. Honestly, the library is usually the last place I turn for reading material, which is sad. There are times though when I have an almost immediate knee-jerk reaction to a book that leads to looking it up on my library’s app. This happened to me recently with a few books, which made me curious about why I sometimes borrow books. Why did I borrow instead of buy? The following books are ones I read from the library so far this year. There’s not many. >.<               Hold Me Closer, Necromancer by Lish McBride None of… Read more »

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TTT: Authors we will automatically buy or read

TTT: Authors we will automatically buy or read

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by The Broke and The Bookish where people who love lists and books can share their favorites based on a certain topic each week. This week’s topic is the authors we auto-buy, however we are tweaking to talk about authors we also auto-read, because libraries. 1. Jacqueline Carey    I’m sure there is no surprise here if you have been following along at all. I do have a lot of her books unread, but own almost all of them due to generosity and library sales. I seriously need more time to read. I have read the entire Kushiel’s Universe series now though (nine books). 2. Rainbow Rowell     I’m also obsessed with Rainbow Rowell’s writing. I own all of the above, however I haven’t made time to read Landline yet. Shame on me! 3. Leila Sales   I really loved the characters and… Read more »

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Review: The Corridor

Review: The Corridor

I feel like it has been some time since I read a proper dystopian and The Corridor is what you’d expect from the genre. It adds up to a interesting story with a break-neck pace, a girl with a secret that could change her world and a rather light portrayal of science. It was good, and I had fun with it. So what happens in The Corridor? Stel is a teenager who has lived her entire life next to a strange portal to another version of Earth, which is called Second Earth (genius!). Her father is a scientist who used to run the compound around the portal, but was replaced after being found ineffectual (I can’t remember exactly why). The corridor isn’t exactly dangerous nor is it completely stable. A power surge blasts through the area one day and Stel finds herself with the ability to open up portals on… Read more »

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Review: Rebel Mechanics

Review: Rebel Mechanics

It is hard for me to believe this, but Rebel Mechanics is my very first Steampunk story! Somehow with my mission to try out different genres, I’ve always managed to miss this one. The closest I’ve come is the New Weird genre with the excellent Unwrapped Sky, which had some Steampunk elements to it, but overall was nothing in comparison to Rebel Mechanics. So this was a very fresh experience! First off, I connected with Verity [whose name always made me think of Code Name Verity, a very fabulous story I insist you read] who pretty much stood for what she believed in and was generally very thoughtful about her choices. It was refreshing to read a story about a young woman new to the big city that also didn’t completely lose herself when she arrives. Soon after getting her position as a governess for a magister and his family,… Read more »

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Review: Mother of Eden

Review: Mother of Eden

Mother of Eden is the follow-up to the acclaimed novel Dark Eden. I actually didn’t know that there was going to be a second novel, as Dark Eden really does fine as a stand alone, but this book was a welcome addition to the world Beckett created. Whereas Dark Eden eased you into the failings of humans, Mother of Eden absolutely slams it in your face. It was particularly painful to read as a feminist and humanist, and I often found myself with a pinched expression, glaring at the screen. But that doesn’t make the book bad, I could just feel the impending doom sitting in the pit of my stomach. Mother of Eden takes place generations after John Redlantern revolutionized his small society. The ripple from this change are absolutely massive, and dividing. Thousands of humans now live in Eden in villages all over the planet, and they all have… Read more »

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Dear blog, I’m sorry

Dear blog, I’m sorry

Dearest blog of mine, I’m sorry I’ve neglected you, with your green theme and neat sans font. At the very least, I did give you some love, updating your widgets so they were fresh and complete. And right now I’m clearing up your insides, from the mess I never properly fixed when we brought you to your new home. I’m also sorry that I’ve been a bit more active on the tumblr clone of you. It’s just so much easier to “blog” there. Yes, I hear you scoffing at that, but really, I’m so so lazy. To try and make up for it, I will give you one of your favorites. Please be appeased. I do promise to update you soon, and with better content than this. I know you’re disappointed in me, blog, but I won’t always let you down. I promise. Oh, did you guys hear that? So… Read more »

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TTT: Fairy tales and mythology retellings

TTT: Fairy tales and mythology retellings

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by The Broke and The Bookish where people who love lists and books can share their favorites based on a certain topic each week. Our list is a mash-up of fairy tales we’ve read, others we want to read and retellings that NEED to happen. And, we’ve taken liberty with fairy tales and included mythos as well. :D 1. Medusa: The Deep End of the Sea by Heather Lyons | Want to read Medusa is always painted as a beast, menace and villain. However, I bet most people don’t know her origin. After being brutally raped by Poseidon in Athena’s temple, Athena then punishes Medusa by cursing her! How does that work? I haven’t read this retelling, but I’m really interested in learning how the author turns the tides on this tale. Anne here: I read this, and it was good! Interesting take on Medusa. Very… Read more »

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Monthly Wrap-Up: July 2015

Monthly Wrap-Up: July 2015

    This is called phoning it in, my friends. I really don’t have much blogging to recap from the month, because we were hardly here. 1. Summer is to blame — how can you blog when there is sun outside? 2. Lethargy is real — see excuse one. Too much sun. I did manage to make it to London this past month for a completely unexpected work trip. I wanted to do some fun bookish stuff, but I was so busy. My old coworker, and now friend, took me out many nights so I didn’t really have time to explore on my own. No complaints here though, because she was awesome and we had a blast. (I also got her to read the Kushiel’s Dart series and she loved it. I count this as a huge personal win.) I did step right inside the flagship Waterstones, but we went… Read more »

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